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Mass GOP Exodus: Alabama US Senator Becomes Fourth to Announce Retirement

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The mass exodus of Republicans from the U.S. Senate continues, with Richard Shelby of Alabama announcing Monday his retirement at the end of his term, the fourth in the GOP caucus to do so so far.

“Today I announce that I will not seek a seventh term in the United States Senate in 2022. For everything, there is a season,” Shelby said in a statement, as The Washington Post reports. “I am grateful to the people of Alabama who have put their trust in me for more than forty years. I have been fortunate to serve in the U.S. Senate longer than any other Alabamian.”

Republican Senator Shelby, now a hard-core conservative, was first Democratic Congressman Shelby in 1978. In 1986 he ran for and won a seat in the Senate, and in 1994 became a Republican.

Shelby has a virulently anti-LGBTQ record. He voted for a constitutional ban of same-sex marriage and for the unconstitutional federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA.) He also voted against adding sexual orientation to the definition of hate crimes and no on expanding hate crimes to include sexual orientation.

Most recently, Shelby voted against Pete Buttigieg’s confirmation as Transportation Secretary.

Image: DoD Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. James K. McCann via Flickr and a CC license

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Biden Moving Quickly to Fire Postmaster General as DeJoy Tells Dems to ‘Get Used To Me’

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President Joe Biden is moving quickly to fire Louis DeJoy. Or rather, since the President does not have the power to fire a Postmaster General, he is moving quickly to have him terminated.

Biden is set to nominate three candidates to the Postal Service’s Board of Governors, giving Democrats a majority, The Washington Post reports.

The President “will nominate Ron Stroman, the Postal Service’s recently retired deputy postmaster general; Amber McReynolds, the chief executive of National Vote at Home Institute; and Anton Hajjar, the former general counsel of the American Postal Workers Union,” the Post reports.

McReynolds’ inclusion was hailed, given her work as a voting rights advocate.

Earlier Wednesday DeJoy snarkily told Democrats they will have to “get used to” him, saying he has no plans to resign despite the millions of dollars of damage to postal machines he caused, and despite the massive delays in mail delivery times he created. Many believe those actions were taken after President Donald Trump waged war on mail-in voting which Democrats advocated for to save lives during the coronavirus pandemic. It was, many say, a concerted effort to undermine the election.

Watch:

Related:

‘Flat-Out Lied’: Elizabeth Warren and a Lot of Other People Sure Think Louis DeJoy Just Committed Perjury

‘Furious’ Federal Judge Orders Postmaster General DeJoy to Be Deposed Over Missing 300,000 Ballots: Reports

DeJoy ‘Regrets if’ Employees Felt Uncomfortable Amid Report He Reimbursed Them for Donations to GOP, an Illegal Practice

 

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Biden Takes First Steps to Replace USPS Postmaster General Louis DeJoy

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President Joe Biden this week took what could be the first steps necessary to replace USPS Postmaster General Louis DeJoy.

In a statement on Monday, the White House explained that the president has moved to fill vacancies at the postal service’s Board of Governors, which has the power to name a new Postmaster General.

“Only the Board of Governors of the US Postal Service has the power to replace the Postmaster General,” the statement said. “The President can, however, nominate governors to fill vacancies on the board pending Senate confirmation.”

The statement noted that three vacancies are currently open on the board. Additionally, a fourth nomination would replace an existing member who is serving a hold-over year.

“President Biden’s focus is on filling these vacancies, nominating officials who reflect his commitment to the workers of the US Postal Service — who can deliver on the post office’s vital universal service obligation,” the White House added.

Postmaster General Louis DeJoy, who was appointed during President Donald Trump’s administration, came under fire after he was accused of trying to undermine the postal service’s role in the 2020 election.

Read the statement below.

 

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Trump Allies Fear Democrats’ ‘Compelling’ Impeachment Case Will End His Political Career Forever: Report

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According to a report from Politico, close allies of Donald Trump are now worried that his second impeachment trial could have a long-range impact on his ability to resurrect his political career because the Democrats will likely focus on the horror of the Jan. 6th storming of the Capitol that the former president is accused of inciting.

While it is likely that few, if any, Republican Senators will vote along with Democrats on the articles of impeachment, associates of the president are saying the ex-president will sustain renewed damage by the nationally televised reliving of that day’s events.

Worse still, the report states, the ex-president is already damaged goods in the eyes of some Republicans.

“The former president, whom House Democrats have accused of inciting the rioters at a rally earlier the same day, is already hemorrhaging support within the GOP. Recent public polls have shown a sharp decline in support among Republican voters for a potential Trump comeback bid in 2024,” Politico reports. “And a widely televised trial that reminds voters and lawmakers of the disturbing moments when MAGA devotees assaulted law enforcement officials and broke into the Capitol building could harm his future political aspirations even more.”

Even former White House advisor Steve Bannon, an ardent backer of the president running again, is worried about the fall-out.

“The Democrats have a very emotional and compelling case,” explained Bannon. “They’re going to try to convict him in the eyes of the American people and smear him forever.”

According to the report, Trump’s attorneys are also worried about the path the trial may take and hope they can limit the scope to the constitutionality of the trial.

“Trump’s legal team appears to have similar trepidations that next week’s proceedings will turn into a high-profile retelling of the riots and his role in them,” the report states before adding, “The concern among Trump’s allies that the trial will be a relitigation of the events at the Capitol underscores the degree to which next week is being viewed as a public relations matter for the optics-obsessed former president. Still, there is little Trump’s team can do to stop the trial from veering towards a discussion of Jan. 6, since the impeachment managers are likely to focus intensely on the riots — and could, indeed, call witnesses to testify about what happened.”

The report adds, “People familiar with Trump’s strategy say his defense attorneys David Schoen and Bruce Castor hope to keep the trial ‘short and sweet’ — not wanting to entangle themselves in a lengthy debate over whether their client’s comments at the ‘Stop the Steal’ rally outside the White House qualify as inciting speech, or legitimize the prosecution’s arguments by focusing on Jan. 6.”

You can read more here.

 

Image via Shutterstock

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