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Kansas Lawmakers File a Bill Voiding Same-Sex Marriage That Reads Like an Anti-LGBTQ Manifesto of Hate

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The bill is being called the “most vile, hateful and disrespectful legislation” ever seen, by the head of Equality Kansas

Nearly four years after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that same-sex couples have a constitutional right to marriage, Republicans in the Kansas House of Representatives have filed legislation that aims to void same-sex marriage.

Not only would House Bill 2320 rescind those rights, it also would cement into law a litany of far right wing extremist claims, including that being LGBTQ is a “mythology,” government recognition of LGBTQ people is “the greatest sham since the inception of American jurisprudence,” and the proposition that there “are no ex-blacks but there are thousands of ex-gays.”

HB 2320, if it were to become law, would designate all existing marriages between same-sex spouses “parody marriages” that “erode community standards of decency.” It also would place LGBTQ people in the same class of people who practice bestiality.

In an obvious violation of the First Amendment, the bill would strip away the religious rights of LGBTQ people by declaring they are all Secular Humanists.

The assertions in the lengthy, 8-page bill are extreme, and reveal a basis in anti-LGBTQ hate from “persecuted Christians,” according to the text of the bill.

“The sworn testimonies of ex-gays, medical experts, persecuted Christians and licensed ministers demonstrate that there is no real proof that a gay gene exists,” begins one passage. It adds that “the idea that sexual orientation is predicated on immutability is not proven,” and “sexual orientation is a mythology, dogma, doctrine or orthodoxy that is inseparably linked to the religion of secular humanism.”

Another passage falsely suggests the LGBTQ community is so well “organized” there is a “daily code” its members observe. Daily KOS says the bill implies “LGBTQ is actually a secret society.”

“The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) community is organized, full and has a daily code by which members may guide their daily lives, which makes it a denominational sect that is inseparably part of the religion of secular humanism.”

To be clear, that is false.

“Instead of having a cross, the ten commandments icon, or star and crescent, the LGBTQ secular humanist community has the gay pride rainbow colored flag to symbolize its faith-based worldview,” the bill also claims. That, too, is false.

The bill creates a religion it calls “LGBTQ secular humanism,” which does not exist. It then falsely declares that “the government’s endorsement of LGBTQ secular humanism has not been about ‘tolerance,’ but ‘dominance.'” And it claims that “many citizens who object to the government’s endorsement of LGBTQ secular humanism is not based on ‘bigotry,’ but on ‘biology,'” which, again, is false.

The lawmakers also attack the popular phrase, “love is love,” declaring that “when a secular humanist says that ‘love is love,’ what they really mean is that they are amenable to government assets being used to oppress and marginalize anyone who disagrees with their beliefs.”

LGBTQ people, the bill claims, seek “to infiltrate public schools and public libraries with the intent to indoctrinate and proselytize minors to their religious worldview on faith, morality, sex and marriage with the government’s stamp of approval.”

The lawmakers who penned HB 2320 perversely point to “the civil rights movement lead by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.” to support their false claims, ignoring the fact that Coretta Scott King has repeatedly said her husband would have supported the LGBTQ civil rights movement.

The lawmakers who are the initial sponsors of the Kansas bill are Republican Representatives Randy GarberOwen DonohoeDavid FrenchCheryl HelmerRon Highland, Steve Huebert, and Bill Rhiley.

Garber is the bill’s lead sponsor, and says LGBTQ people are “trying to force their beliefs on society.”

The Wichita Eagle notes the legislation “comes just months after voters elected the state’s first openly gay lawmakers and less than two weeks after the introduction of a bill that would prohibit discrimination against LGBT individuals statewide.”

Tom Witt, the head of Equality Kansas, calls the bill the “most vile, hateful and disrespectful legislation” he’s ever seen.

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Missouri Lawmaker Wants to Make It Easy for Parents to Sue Their Local School if Kids Are ‘Subjected To’ Anything LGBTQ

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A Missouri state lawmaker is pushing a bill that would make it easy for parents to sue schools if their children are “subjected to” anything LGBTQ.

Rep. Chuck Basye wants parents to have total control over what their children see in school, even if it’s not part of the curriculum. The bill is in response to a poster a GSA – gay-straight alliance club – put up without getting approval from all the students’ parents.

Basye says the purpose of his legislation “is to give this a little bit of teeth so parents can take action if they feel that they’re not being listened to or their child is subjected to something they don’t agree with,” MissouriNet reports.

“I think the parents have a right to know what is in front of their children in public schools,” Basye told MissouriNet.. “That’s the intent of the bill, nothing more, nothing less.”

The ACLU has weighed in, and says Basye’s bill, HB 1565, goes too far.

“This is not only way too far reaching, but absolutely censorship of essentially livelihoods and existence at all,” Jay-Marie Hill, with the American Civil Liberties Union of Missouri, told MissouriNet. Hill says if the bill becomes law teachers could be responsible, and even fired, if they have a guest speaker who says something parents might disagree with.

The bill is clearly framed to focus on “instruction on human sexuality and sexually transmitted diseases.”

And while it says information presented to students must be “medically and factually accurate,” it also mandates that “abstinence from sexual activity as the preferred choice of behavior in relation to all sexual activity for unmarried pupils.”

Abstinence only education has been proven to not work.

Some responses to Rep. Basye’s bill from social media:

UPDATE: 4:56 PM –
Rep. Basye’s Democratic challenger, Adrian Plank, calls Basye’s bill “one of the most obviously discriminatory pieces of legislation that I’ve ever seen in Missouri.

What I find inappropriate is a legislator that spends his time trying to pass bills that uses the power of the government to treat those most vulnerable like they are lesser human beings, or even worse, that they don’t exist. That they shouldn’t be considered worthy of attention. People have real problems that need solved, and this is how he chooses to spend his time.

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Texas GOP Official Compares LGBTQ Republicans to ‘Murderers and Burglars’ in Unhinged Facebook Rant

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Early on Wednesday morning, a Texas Republican Party official took to Facebook to attack the “Log Cabin Republicans,” the GOP’s LGBTQ advocacy arm.

The diatribe, first flagged on Twitter by author and nonprofit director Jessica Shortall, was in reply to a post by former LCR Houston official Marco Antonio Roberts, who was responding to a threat from a member of the State Republican Executive Committee to deny the LCR credentials at the Texas GOP State Convention.

“As a group [LCR] is no longer about an individual participating, but it is an express advocacy group, and the LCR’s unique identity is homosexuality which is in conflict with the principles & platform of the Republican Party,” wrote Sue Evenwel. “The party would also not allow express advocacy groups for murders, burglars, adulterers or fornicators, yet there may be some among us dealing with those issues who are also Republicans working and voting for our candidates.”

Evenwel, the chairwoman of the Titus County Republican Party, is also a member of the State Republican Executive Committee, which is currently grappling with the future of the LCR’s status within the state party.

She is best known for being a lead plaintiff in the landmark Supreme Court case Evenwel v. Abbott, in which she argued that federal courts should force states to apportion legislative districts using the number of eligible voters, rather than the total population. Such a change would have invalidated nearly all state legislative lines in the country, and forced lawmakers to draw up districts that are overwhelmingly more rural, white, and conservative.

In 2016, the Supreme Court ruled unanimously against Evenwel, holding that states are not required to exclude nonvoters from redistricting — but they also did not explicitly prohibit it, potentially leaving the door open for conservative state legislatures to do so after this year’s census.

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Student With Two Moms Banned From Writing Paper ‘Taking a Stand’ in Favor of Same-Sex Marriage

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A family in Michigan is speaking out after their daughter, a high school junior, was banned from writing a paper in favor of same-sex marriage for an honors English class where the assignment was to “take a stand” on an issue of great cultural importance.

The teacher, whose name the school district will not release, first said the topic was too controversial and might offend some students. She then confessed she did not want to read or hear about marriage equality, according to MLive and The Advocate.

17-year-old Destiny McDermitt said she wanted to write her paper, which would also be read as a speech, on same-sex marriage because her mothers are married. Angela McDermitt-Jackson and Chris Jackson married in 2015 just months before the U.S. Supreme Court found same-sex couples have the same rights and responsibilities to marriage as their different-sex peers.

The assignment sounds bold, but the teacher made sure it could not be.

“For every generation in every country, every day, there are issues upon which an individual can take a stand,” the assignment description reportedly reads. “This assignment asks you to think about what concerns you in your community, your state, your country, or the world.”

Students were not allowed to choose “anything that is awkward or inappropriate for a school audience.” The topic of abortion was banned, but the school district’s guidance says controversial subjects can have a legitimate place in learning.

Several students wrote letters to school administrators to support their classmate, destiny, and to complain that the teacher said she did not want to read or grade a paper on same-sex marriage.

Destiny has opted to move to a different class with a different teacher.

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