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‘Psychiatric Drugs’ for Depression – Not Guns – Are to Blame for Mass Shootings Says Tea Party Governor

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Antidepressants That ‘Have Very Severe Warnings Associated With Them Related to Depression and Suicidal Thoughts’ Are to Blame Says Matt Bevin

Kentucky Tea Party Republican Governor Matt Bevin is claiming the cause of America’s gun violence and mass shooting pandemic is antidepressants. In what is being billed as a “business meeting” between Democratic and Republican governors and President Trump, Governor Bevin on Monday shared his beliefs on the gun crisis.

Bevin, who has been strongly supported by the NRA, told his fellow governors and President Trump the way to start fixing the gun violence problem is to “seize the bully pulpits that we have to talk abut the culture in this society.”

“I would challenge those in the media who would want to mock and ridicule this,” Bevin continued, saying that America was built on the “foundational principles” of treating “people the way you’d want to be treated, you respect human life, you respect the dignity of women, and children, and people who we have increasingly degraded in our society.”

While all those ideals are important, in no way was America founded on those principles. America was founded through the genocide of Native Americans, while women were not allowed to vote, and children were allowed to work in factories at very early ages. 

“This culture of death is becoming pervasive and if it’s not addressed by all the imperfect people in this room with a sense of purpose and sense of aspiration, I think we are going to see a continued trajectory that is not good,” Bevin said, as Talking Points Memo reports.

“There have always been guns in homes and fewer rules,” he continued, as the president shook his head in agreement. “It isn’t to say that these rules and restrictions are necessarily bad, but what has changed is what we do or don’t do as it relates to acknowledging the value and dignity of every human life,” Bevin insisted.

“When you couple that with the number of psychiatric drugs that are increasingly systemic and have very severe warnings associated with them related to depression and suicidal thoughts, you put all these things in a mess and no one among us is bold enough or willing to step up and challenge of the fact that this is a problem. This is why it goes unchecked.”

Pat Robertson in November wrongly blamed the Texas church massacre on anti-depressants, the same argument that Bevin is making. Unfortunately, neither has done their homework.

A study published in 2012 that looked at 14 years of data from the Netherlands found a significant negative association between violence and antidepressant use—that is, that when people took prescribed antidepressants, violence tended to decrease,” Newsweek reports.

Talking Points Memo notes that just last month, “after an armed student attacked a school in his state and killed two and injured 18, Bevin blamed violence in movies, video games and music lyrics for desensitizing young people to violence.”

Immediately after Bevin spoke President Trump also blamed mass shootings on violence in movies and video games.

Hat tip: Talking Points Memo

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TOTAL INCOMPETENCE

Hours After Announcing He Invoked the Defense Production Act for Ventilators Trump Backtracks – for the Second Time Today

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President Donald Trump once again is bowing to corporate America and vacillating on using the full force of the law to save American lives.

Two hours after the White House issued a statement announcing President Trump had invoked the Defense Production Act, directing General Motors to produce ventilators (quantity, timeline, and cost not announced), Trump is again backtracking – for the second time in as many hours.

After the White House press statement, Trump sat at the Resolute Desk, telling reporters in the Oval Office, “I’ve enacted the Act, we’ve used it three of four times.” That’s false. He had never officially used the law.

“We did activate it with respect to General Motors,” he continued, announcing he has ordered the car company to produce ventilators. He added, “maybe we won’t need the full activation we’ll find out.”

That’s not how the law works.

And now, at his daily coronavirus press conference, Trump again backtracked.

“This invocation of the DPA should demonstrate clearly to all that we will not hesitate to use the full authority of the federal government to combat this crisis. We thought we had a deal for example with General Motors and I guess they thought otherwise. They didn’t agree, and now they do, they do agree, and I think we might be able to pull it,” he said, referring to his direction under the DPA to GM to make ventilators.

Proving he has no intention of actually using the law, Trump scolded the $137 billion multinational corporation: “We let them know how we felt, and they can’t be doin’ that.”

It is unclear if Trump will actually use the law, as intended, to mandate GM produce the life-saving equipment. There appears to be no contract, no order, no number of ventilators to be produced, nor at what cost. There also appears to be no specifications, and no timeline as to how many are to be delivered when.

UPDATE:
Minutes later, talking about ventilators being made, Trump says, “Hopefully General Motors will join the fray.”

He did not explain why he said “hopefully.”

Later, Trump explains that he doesn’t want to “get ripped off on price,” then says: “So General Motors, we’ll see what happens.”

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WE SHOULD TRUST YOU WHY?

Trump Again Claims He’s Invoked the Defense Production Act – Then Backtracks Saying ‘Maybe We Won’t Need’ to Fully Use It

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President Donald Trump Friday afternoon announced he has invoked the Defense Production Act to require GM to produce vitally-needed life-saving ventilators. But it’s not the first time has and his administration have claimed the DPA was being used to require the production of critical equipment, nor is it being used as it should be.

In announcing he had finally invoked it, to force GM to make ventilators they already have announced they will produce, Trump immediately backtracked, nonsensically saying he might not need to fully use the law.

“I’ve enacted the Act, we’ve used it three of four times,” Trump said, which is a lie, claiming “the companies came through in the end they didn’t need the Act.”

That’s not how the law works.

“It’s been great leverage I have instituted it against General Electric, we thought we had a deal for 40,000 ventilators,” Trump claimed, which again is false, it was for 20,000.

NEW: Hours After Announcing He Invoked the Defense Production Act for Ventilators Trump Backtracks – for the Second Time Today

“We did activate it with respect to General Motors and hopefully – maybe we won’t need the full activation we’ll find out,” he said, after calling the car company “General Electric.”

Every day that went by that theDPA remained unused is a day in the future more people will die, literally unable to breathe due to an insufficient number of ventilators across the nation.

RELATED: Trump Whiplashes From Saying We Don’t Need 40,000 Ventilators to Calling Them ‘Much Needed’ – Now He’s Threatening GM

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GREED

‘How About Keeping Americans Alive?’: House Republican Leader Slammed for Saying Top Priority Is to Keep People ‘At Work’

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Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) is under fire for declaring in a lengthy House speech the Republicans’ “top priority” during the coronavirus pandemic is to keep people at work.

Many latched on to his remarks, made just before the House passed the Senate’s $2 trillion coronavirus package, which will now be sent to President Donald Trump’s desk.

“Our top priority is to keep Americans at work,” McCarthy told his socially-distancing colleagues in the House chamber.

Many felt Congress’ top priority under the coronavirus crisis should be keeping people alive, and hopefully healthy – not working, especially as the President and Republicans look for ways to “relax” social distancing and stay at home policies, which will only lead to more people becoming infected, and dying.

But that wasn’t McCarthy’s only concerning comment.

“We all saw that tragic news this week: 3.3 million Americans filed for unemployment benefits,” he said during his oratory.

Some also saw this as dereliction of duty. The tragedy to many is that people are dying, not that they are getting unemployment benefits.

Here’s how many are responding:

 

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