Connect with us

A Lot Of People Are Angry Thinking The Super Bowl Halftime Show Was ‘Promoting Homosexuality’

Published

on

A lot of people took to social media to complain the Super Bowl Halftime show was an attempt to advance the gay agenda, or something.

The old saying goes, “When you’re a hammer, you think everything is a nail.” And when you’re anti-gay, apparently you think every thing with lots of colors is promoting homosexuality. 

Sunday’s Super Bowl 50 Halftime show closed with Beyoncé, Bruno Mars, Coldplay, and the entire stadium audience sending the message: “Believe in Love.”

It was actually promoting Coldplay’s new album:

But because the colors in the cards, as seen in this tweet Coldplay posted, might be considered “rainbow,” the anti-gay crowd on Twitter went nuts.

Friendly Atheist’s Hemant Mehta observes the anti-gay “complaints come from the same people who are watching a game in which dozens of men jump on top of each other for hours before dancing and patting each other on the butt.”

Gay Star News’ Joe Morgan adds, “if the NFL were planning on promoting gay rights, actually drafting an openly gay football player and keeping him on a team would probably be a good start. Right, Michael Sam?”

 

Image via Coldplay/Twitter

Continue Reading
Click to comment
 
 

Enjoy this piece?

… then let us make a small request. The New Civil Rights Movement depends on readers like you to meet our ongoing expenses and continue producing quality progressive journalism. Three Silicon Valley giants consume 70 percent of all online advertising dollars, so we need your help to continue doing what we do.

NCRM is independent. You won’t find mainstream media bias here. From unflinching coverage of religious extremism, to spotlighting efforts to roll back our rights, NCRM continues to speak truth to power. America needs independent voices like NCRM to be sure no one is forgotten.

Every reader contribution, whatever the amount, makes a tremendous difference. Help ensure NCRM remains independent long into the future. Support progressive journalism with a one-time contribution to NCRM, or click here to become a subscriber. Thank you. Click here to donate by check.

'BRUTAL'

Russia is torturing civilians in camps around eastern Ukraine

Published

on

The Russian military has established 10 torture sites in the eastern city of Izium, Ukraine, the Associated Press (AP) reported. Torture is a war crime under the Geneva Conventions.

Eight men died killed under torture in Russian custody, the AP wrote. All but one were civilians.

Russian forces captured Andriy Kotsar, tied him up, and threw him for several days in a trench covered with wooden boards. They beat his legs and arms and smashed his knees with a hammer. They then took his ID and passport so that he would find it hard to prove his identity, get help, or escape.

Russian forces captured him two more times after that. The torture was worse both times, Kotsar said.

“Russian torture in Izium was arbitrary, widespread, and absolutely routine for both civilians and soldiers throughout the city,” the Associated Press investigation found. The torture included waterboarding and electrocution, among other pain-inducing methods.

Mykola Mosyaky, a 38-year-old Ukrainian soldier, was handcuffed, thrown in a pit of dirty water, and hung by the wrists until his skin went numb.

“They beat me with sticks. They hit me with their hands, they kicked me, they put out cigarettes on me, they pressed matches on me,” he stated. “They said, ‘Dance,’ but I did not dance. So they shot my feet.”

Dr. Yuriy Kuznetsov, an emergency room physician in Izium, said that Ukrainians are showing up to his hospital with torture-related injuries, including “gunshots to their hands and feet, broken bones and severe bruising, and burns.” The victims never say how they got their injuries, worried about retaliation if they do.

A father and son who were both tortured said they could hear women’s screams every night as Russian soldiers raped them in a nearby garage.

Russians showed one local woman the body of her battered, unconscious soldier husband, pressuring her to provide information that she knew nothing about.

At least 30 bodies taken from a mass grave in the city showed “visible marks of torture,” including “bound hands, close gunshot wounds, knife wounds, and broken limbs.”

“[Torture] serves three purposes,” said Rachel Denber of Human Rights Watch. “Torture came with questions to coerce information, but it is also to punish and to sow fear. It is to send a chilling message to everyone else.”

On September 30,  Russia held sham referendums in the eastern Ukrainian territories of Luhansk, Donetsk, Zaporizhzhia, and Kherson. While the referendums sought to cede the territories to Russia, their outcomes were pre-determined by Russia as a way to basically lay claim to the territories.

The U.S. called the referendums illegal and also authorized an additional $12 billion in military aid to Ukraine.

Continue Reading

'APPARENTLY INEBRIATED'

Supreme Court refuses to protect Mike Lindell from a billion dollar defamation lawsuit

Published

on

The Supreme Court just started its new term, and among its first act, it refused to hear an appeal from Mike Lindell — the conspiracy theorist, supporter of former President Donald Trump, and MyPillow CEO — who wanted the court to throw out a $1.3 billion defamation lawsuit against him.

The lawsuit was filed by Dominion Voting Systems, a manufacturer of voting machines, to litigate against Lindell for his repeated claims that their machinery played a role in “stealing” the 2020 election from Trump. He made his claims on Fox News and various media and social media outlets.

In response to Dominion’s lawsuit, Lindell filed a countersuit accusing the voting machine company of using the court system to “silence Lindell’s and others’ political speech about election fraud and the role of electronic voting machines in it.”

His countersuit also accused the company of “waging lawsuit warfare on private citizens…under the auspices of ‘defending election integrity’…[rather than] fixing their notoriously and demonstrably insecure voting machines.” The lawsuit said the company had “embarked on a concerted, collective enterprise to extort silence from their dissenters or bring financial ruin on any and all who persist in speaking their minds.”

In August 2021, Lindell held a public “cyber symposium” which, he said, would show undeniable proof about how voting machines helped steal the 2020 election.

Rob Graham, a cyber expert who attended the symposium, said, “[Lindell] gave us experts NOTHING today, except random garbage that wastes our time.” Graham said the Lindell had promised to give cyber experts who attended the symposium “packet captures from the November 2020 election could be unencrypted to reveal evidence of voter fraud.” Graham said those packets were never provided.

Fox News refused to run advertisements about the symposium. Lindell was accused of using the symposium as nothing more than to try and maintain relevance and continue the narrative about the “stolen election.”

Several months after the 2020 election, Lindell claimed that Trump would return as president by August. 2021 Lindell said this would occur either through Supreme Court rulings or “two other bonus pathways” involving vote audits in states that Trump lost in 2020.

Lindell said that once the Supreme Court considers his evidence of voter fraud, the justices will unanimously rule 9-0 in favor of allowing Trump to become president once again.

Lindell was wrong.

 

Continue Reading

News

Matt Gaetz demands hurricane aid for Florida after voting against it

Published

on

Last week, Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.)  voted against a government funding measure that contained $18.8 billion in federal disaster aid for natural disasters, including Hurricane Ian, which just ravaged his home state. Gaetz was one of 15 Florida lawmakers who voted against it.

On Sunday, Gaetz went to Twitter to ask for government assistance for “my fellow Florida Man in grave need of assistance.” His tweet said, “Just send us like half of what you sent Ukraine,” a reference to the money that the U.S. has donated to help Ukraine fight off Russia’s ongoing invasion.

Various Twitter users called him a hypocrite for his tweet, but his key audience is likely people who don’t know about his vote or those who oppose the United States’ involvement in a foreign conflict, even if checking Russia’s aggression helps aid U.S. interests in Europe.

The continuing resolution that Gaetz voted against made money available from Federal Emergency Management Agency’s disaster relief fund for states dealing with costly natural disasters. It also contained $12 billion to aid Ukraine. Both of Florida’s Republican senators, Rick Scott and Marco Rubio, also didn’t vote in favor of the resolution.

On his podcast last Friday, Gaetz said Democrats had rammed the resolution without going through the committee process, effectively cutting out Republicans from being able to add or remove funding from it.

The hurricane killed about 68 Floridians, caused at least $55 billion in damages, and has left 600,000 homes in Florida without power.

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 AlterNet Media.