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Scott Walker Walks Back His Disgusting Suggestion That Gay Scout Leaders Are Pedophiles – By Lying?

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Scott Walker got asked by a reporter about the Boy Scouts’ plan to allow gay adult Scout leaders, and he gave his honest answer – which turned out to be offensive and disgusting. Now, he’s trying to walk it back. Is he lying about what he meant?

That’s Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker in the photo above, speaking at CPAC, the Conservative Political Action Convention. CPAC is the far right wing’s annual get-together that is so anti-gay they don’t even allow gay GOP groups, like Log Cabin Republicans, or the now defunct gay Tea Party group, GOProud, to have an official presence. A few years ago when they did, the outrage was huge, and led to boycotts.

Scott Walker fits in perfectly.

Last year, Gov. Walker spent months being coy about his position on marriage for same-sex couples.

In June of 2014 he claimed that despite same-sex marriage cases being tried in nearly half the states in the nation, his opinion on the issue gripping the nation “really doesn’t matter.”

After a few more months of being coy, Walker, just before the November elections, made his position clear.

In September Walker had sought the endorsement of one of Wisconsin’s most anti-gay organizations. In a September 5 letter to Wisconsin Family Action he quietly told them, the AP had reported, “he supports marriage between one man and one woman.”

His anti-gay record is clear, but like a high school bully he’s teased LGBT people from time to time about how he feels about them. A few months ago, when every GOP presidential candidate was being asked if they would attend a wedding of a same-sex couple, Walker offered up a quintessential Walker response.

“That’s certainly a personal issue,” Walker began, which, of course, if you’re running for president, it is not. He told reporters he, his wife, his wife Tonette and their children “already had a family member who’s had a reception. I haven’t been to a wedding,” the Wisconsin governor said, making sure to let the press know his “position on marriage is still that’s defined between a man and a woman,” and adding, “I support the Constitution of the state.”

“But for someone I love, we’ve been at a reception.”

He never, of course, answered the actual question.

When asked by a reporter this week about the Boy Scouts’ move to drop its ban on gay adult Scout leaders, Walker was only too happy to offer a disgusting, thinly-veiled anti-gay response, suggesting that gays are pedophiles.

“I was an Eagle Scout, my kids have been involved, Tonette (Walker) was a den mother,” Walker told IJReview.

“I have had a lifelong commitment to the Scouts and support the previous membership policy because it protected children and advanced Scout values.”

Now, under fire for parroting the religious right’s homophobia a bit to closely, yesterday Walker tried to walk back his comments.

Oh, he didn’t mean to suggest that gay people are pedophiles, oh no.

The New York Times reports that “during a brief news conference in South Carolina on Wednesday, Mr. Walker said that he was not pushing to save the ban — ‘it’s up to the Boy Scouts’ — and that his earlier remarks were not about protecting children from gay people.”

“The protection was not a physical protection,” he said, but rather about “protecting them from being involved in the very thing you’re talking about right now, the political and media discussion about it, instead of just focusing on what Scouts is about, which is about camping and citizenship and things of that nature.”

It’s stunning he didn’t add, “And how dare you suggest that I think gay people are pedophiles!”

Let’s look at his earlier statement again.

“I have had a lifelong commitment to the Scouts and support the previous membership policy because it protected children and advanced Scout values.”

Here’s what Walker thus is insisting he meant:

“I have had a lifelong commitment to the Scouts and support the previous membership policy because it protected children from being involved in the political and media discussion about gay Scout leaders and advanced Scout values.”

Seriously?

Managing Editor and Washington Bureau Chief of Talking Points Memo, David Kurtz, writes, “Scott Walker’s attempted walkback of his comments about the Boy Scouts’ ban on gay leaders as having “protected children” is ridiculous on its face.”

Even that is too kind.

 

Image by Gage Skidmore via Flickr and a CC license

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ANALYSIS

Right Wing Pundit’s Claim Conservative SCOTUS Justice Alito Is Also Considering Retiring Sets Off Court Watchers on Both Sides

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Could the two most-conservative Supreme Court justices retire before the November election? Rumors are swirling. Here’s why.

Buried within Washington Post national political reporter Robert Costa’s analysis Wednesday that Trump supporters are hoping “to use conservative anger at Justice Roberts” as an “energizing moment” for the President’s troubled campaign, is the news that far right Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas is “privately seen by Trump’s aides as the most likely to retire this year.”

The potential retirement of Justice Thomas, who by most measures is the most conservative jurist on the nation’s top court, set off a firestorm on social media among some court-watching conservatives and liberals – even though Costa noted that “Thomas has not given any indication” he is retiring.

Costa’s reporting was, he says, seen by far right wing pundit Hugh Hewitt, who told his “radio audience this morning that he hears from several leading conservatives that Justice Alito, 70, is considering retirement, and adds that he also hears the Alito family is ready to leave Washington, D.C.”

Hewitt, in his usual self-aggrandizing way, told his listeners, “I’m hardly a ref, but I got a column in the Washington Post, and so they start working me about, ‘You know this person would be great if Alito quit.'”

Whether or not Alito is considering retirement, the mere prospect of not just one but possibly two Supreme Court seats opening before the election is giving conservatives hope, and liberals terror.

Not even trying hard to hide their excitement, some on the religious right are especially ecstatic President Donald Trump might get to place one or two more radical jurists on the Supreme Court.

An attorney for the far Christian-right law and anti-LGBTQ advocacy firm First Liberty Institute responded with thinly-veiled glee, couching his happiness as concern for Justice Alito’s family.

The Justice Correspondent for The Nation, Elie Mystal, responded to a legal correspondent for New York’s local Fox station, implying Alito might be more likely to retire than Thomas.

Vox Senior Correspondent Ian Millhiser, who literally wrote the book on the Supreme Court, also puts more weight in Alito retiring:

Of course, on the left, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is also of retirement age and has (successfully) faced health issues.

Whoever is President at 12:01 PM ET on January 20, 2020, may have an opportunity to move the court fully one way or the other.

 

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BYE?

Trump Regrets Following Kushner’s Advice as He Speeds to Embrace Only His Own Instincts: Report

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During the 2016 presidential campaign candidate Donald Trump was mocked for repeatedly saying, “I alone can fix it.”

It appears he’s following that thinking once again, as he speeds faster and faster away from the advice of his most-trusted advisor, son-in-law Jared Kushner, according to Axios’s Jonathan Swan.

“President Trump has told people in recent days that he regrets following some of son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner’s political advice — including supporting criminal justice reform — and will stick closer to his own instincts,” Axios reports.

“One person who spoke with the president interpreted his thinking this way: ‘No more of Jared’s woke s***.’ Another said Trump has indicated that following Kushner’s advice has harmed him politically.”

As proof of his move away from Kushner and police reform, Swan points to Trump’s recent tweets.

“He’s tweeted enthusiastically about arresting people who are looting or damaging statues, and has promised to veto must-pass defense spending legislation if it removes Confederate generals’ names from military bases,” Swan writes.

And as recently as this morning, “Trump described ‘Black Lives Matter’ as a ‘symbol of hate.'”

Photo: One year ago, President Trump at the G20 with Jared Kushner.
Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead via Flickr

 

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News

‘You Just Want to Talk About White Power’: Kellyanne Conway Attacks Reporters Over Trump’s Racist Tweet

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White House adviser Kellyanne Conway clashed with reporters on Wednesday over a racist video that was shared on Twitter by President Donald Trump.

While taking questions outside the White House, NBC’s Kristen Welker asked Conway about a video tweeted by Trump in which a man shouts “white power.”

Conway noted that the president had eventually deleted the tweet.

“Does he need to condemn white power?” Welker asked.

“He condemned it by taking it down,” Conway replied. “He never heard that. He doesn’t support that phrase. This is a president that has worked for all Americans. If you’re not going to cover the other side of the coin, respectfully, everything he’s done for African-Americans, Hispanics, Asian-Americans, vulnerable populations.”

“You just want to talk about white power!” she complained. “He took the tweet down. Do you regret asking it three days later. I mean, honestly, you’re like a reporter for a major — I respect you, Kristen — you’re a reporter for a major network and you’re gnawing on the same bone three days later. Why?”

“It’s not a three-day-old story,” the reporter pressed. “Because there’s a reckoning on race in this country. That’s going on now. And the president still hasn’t come out and condemned it.”

“Condemned what?” Conway interrupted.

“White power,” the reporter said. “It’s a longer story.”

“No, it’s a longer story because you want it to be,” Conway remarked. “Because you think you decide how the president speaks and what words and punctuation he uses. And it doesn’t work that way. America sees what he’s doing for this country.”

“So, yes, we have to have an ongoing conversation,” she added. “I have that conversation with my own children. Of course we should have it as a nation. But if you’re just going to throw out the Sesame Street word of the day and expect us to have a conversation, that’s not how to have a conversation.”

Watch the video below from C-SPAN.

 

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