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Angie’s List Cancels $40 Million 1000 Jobs Indiana Expansion Over Anti-Gay ‘Religious Freedom’ Law

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Popular local business review and search site Angie’s List is canceling its expansion plans in response to Indiana’s “religious freedom” law.

Since the year after its 1995 founding, Angie’s List has been headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana. The $315 million corporation which lets users review local businesses, especially home improvement professionals, has been planning a $40 million renovation of its own, moving its headquarters across town and adding 1000 new jobs over five years.

But thanks to state lawmakers and Republican Governor Mike Pence‘s new Indiana Religious Freedom Restoration Act, those expansion plans have been canceled.

“Angie’s List is open to all and discriminates against none and we are hugely disappointed in what this bill represents,” CEO Bill Oesterle said in a statement today, adding, the expansion is “on hold until we fully understand the implications of the freedom restoration act on our employees, both current and future.”

UPDATE: 
How’s This For Proof Mike Pence Is Lying When He Says His Anti-Gay Bill Isn’t About Discrimination?

The company’s statement noted it “will begin reviewing alternatives for the expansion of its headquarters immediately.”

The IndyStar adds that Angie’s list “hinted that moving some parts of the company out of state is ‘on the table.'”

Oesterle has said in the past that the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, signed Thursday by Gov. Mike Pence, was non-inclusive and would make it harder for the state’s companies to attract top talent.

Oesterle is well known in Republican and business circles, and he was former Gov. Mitch Daniels’ campaign manager in 2004.

The decision by Angie’s List to pull back its investment in Indiana is part of a huge and growing negative response from businesses and other financial interests across the country that do business or are based in Indiana, and other public individuals and entities, including the world’s largest and most-respected corporation, Apple, Inc., the City of San Francisco, the White House, Broadway’s Audra McDonald, $4 billion software firm Salesforce, $50 million annual gaming convention Gen Con, Fortune 500 member Cummins, Eskenazi Health, Eli Lilly and Co., Yelp, Hillary Clinton, George Takei, Pat McAfee, Jason Collins, Ashton Kutcher, Miley Cyrus, James Van Der Beek, Sophia Bush, Dustin Lance Black, Mara Wilson, Jack Antonoff, the Mayor of Indianapolis, and the State of Indiana’s own tourism board.

 

Image by WFIU Public Radio via Flickr and a CC license
Hat Tip: TJ

 

 

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NOT AN EXPERT

Watch: MSNBC’s Joy Reid Takes Down Architect of the Critical Race Theory Culture War in Epic Debate

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MSNBC host Joy Reid took on Christopher Rufo, the think-tank “scholar” who claimed to be an expert on race because he works as a “scholar” at a conservative think tank. Speaking Wednesday, Reid got him to confess that he’s neither an expert in race nor in law, which is where the idea of critical race theory is generally taught.

Rufo claimed that Reid was attacking him on air, which she corrected, saying that she was doing nothing more than reading the quote from his own documents.

Reid began by asking at what point “critical race theory” was invented, and he didn’t know, saying sometime in the 1980s or 1990s. Reid cited the Harvard University paper in which it was first mentioned in 1981 by Professor Derrick Bell, who died in 2011.

She cited Rufo’s “documentary” on critical race theory that cites professors or professorial types who he admits are academics who he claims are replacing equality with equity, which is a conservative charge Reid said she’s been hearing since she was in high school. “To ending individual property rights and even to committing reverse genocide or calling for reverse genocide.”

Rufo said that it wasn’t true, which is when Reid said she would play the clip if Rufo allowed her to do it, but he wouldn’t. He said that the term is counter genocide, a genocide perpetrated in retaliation to another genocide.

Rufo claims in his talking points that the father of critical race theory was Ibram X. Kendi, who told Reid that he wasn’t a critical race theorist.

“I admire critical race theory but I don’t identify as a critical race theorist. I’m not a legal scholar, so I wasn’t trained on critical race theory,” Kendi said. “I’m a historian and Chris would know that if he actually read my work or understood that critical race theory is taught in law schools. I didn’t attend law school.”

Rufo began to complain that Reid was citing things and not letting him answer, but she explained she wanted to go through her list of disputes.

Rufo claimed that he wasn’t a political operative, but Reid rolled a video of Rufo speaking at the Claremont Institute on May 18 in which he called critical race theory a political “cudgel,” meaning a giant political weapon. He went on to supplement his point by quoting Barbara Applebaum, who he said was a critical race theorist. She’s, in fact, listed as being trained in philosophy and education and “her research is heavily influenced by feminist ethics, feminist philosophy, and critical race theory.”

He also quoted American author Robin DiAngelo who did her thesis on whiteness in racial dialogues. She also is an education professor, not a critical theorist, according to her website.

“There are these very pathetic and very angry graduate students who try to fight me on these highly technical haggle interpretations,” said Rufo. “I don’t have time for this. Like I don’t give a sh*t.”

Reid noted that there again explains that critical race theory isn’t something being taught in kindergarten, it’s a graduate-level conversation among academics.

His argument fell apart from there.

See the videos below:

 

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News

Rudy Giuliani Suspended From Practicing Law Over ‘Demonstrably False and Misleading Statements’: Report

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Rudy Giuliani has been temporarily suspended from practicing law over his  false and misleading statements about the 2020 presidential election.

“A disciplinary body says he made ‘demonstrably false and misleading statements to courts, lawmakers and the public at large in his capacity as lawyer for former President Donald J. Trump,'” Reuters’ Jan Wolfe reports, citing a New York Supreme Court document.

The document goes on to say that Giuliani’s “conduct immediately threatens the public interest.”

“The suspension is a stunning blow to Giuliani, the former New York City mayor who previously served as a top Justice Department official, and the head prosecutor for the federal Southern District of New York,” CNBC adds.

This is a breaking news and developing story. 

 

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PRESIDENT NARCISSIST

Trump Was Likely Contagious, Posed Risk to Staff When He Defiantly Removed Mask After COVID Hospitalization: Report

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When then-President Donald Trump triumphantly walked up the steps of the Truman Balcony upon his return to the White House from Walter Reed and removed his face mask in an act of defiance to proclaim his victory against his personal bout with COVID-19, he was “probably” still contagious and posed a risk to staffers awaiting him inside.

Facing the cameras from the balcony, he used his right hand to unhook the mask loop from his right ear, then raised his left hand to pull the mask off his face. He was heavily made up, his face more orange tinted than in the photos from the hospital. The helicopter’s rotors were still spinning. He put the mask into his right pocket, as if he was discarding it once and for all, then raised both hands in a thumbs-up. He was still probably contagious, standing there for all the world to see. He made a military salute as the helicopter departed the South Lawn, and then strode into the White House, passing staffers on his way and failing to protect them from the virus particles emitted from his nose and mouth.

That’s just one disturbing detail from The Washington Post‘s look “Inside the extraordinary effort to save Trump from covid-19,” which is adapted from the book, “Nightmare Scenario: Inside the Trump Administration’s Response to the Pandemic That Changed History,”

Trump had been pumped with a “dizzying array of emergency medicines,” including drugs “not yet available to the public.”

When Trump was hospitalized, White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, “colleagues say was consumed with fear the president might die.”

Yet true to form for the Trump White House, despite Trump’s attendance at multiple superspreader events, his daily refusal to allow mask-wearing, to wear a mask himself, or to socially distance, Meadows apparently never even bothered to prepare a plan of action in case Trump became infected with the deadly coronavirus that, back in October had already killed 200,0o0 Americans.

“Trump’s brush with severe illness and the prospect of death caught the White House so unprepared that they had not even briefed Vice President Mike Pence’s team on a plan to swear him in if Trump became incapacitated,” the Post reveals.

Meanwhile, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Robert Redfield, who Rolling Stone branded as one of “The Four Men Responsible For America’s COVID-19 Test Disaster,” spent that October weekend in prayer.

“Had the United States been able to track” the coronavirus’s “earliest movements and identify hidden hot spots, local quarantines might have confined the disease,” The New York Times reported in March of 2020.

The Post reveals that “Redfield spent the weekend Trump was sick praying. He prayed the president would recover. He prayed that he would emerge from the experience with a newfound appreciation for the seriousness of the threat. And he prayed that Trump would tell Americans they should listen to public health advisers before it was too late.”

“The virus had begun a violent resurgence. Redfield, Fauci, Birx and others felt they had limited time to persuade people to behave differently if they were going to avoid a massive wave of death,” the Post explains. “There were few signs that weekend that Trump would have a change of heart.”

Read the entire report here.

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