Sarah Palin Endorses Abbott: ‘Good Enough For Ted Nugent, Good Enough For Me!’

 
 
 

var addthis_config = {"data_track_addressbar":true};Sarah Palin is trying to claw her way to relevancy by scratching out Wendy Davis and endorsing Greg Abbott in the Texas gubernatorial primaries. Mama Grizzly has entered the Lone Star gubernatorial race by jumping on Ted Nugent's coattails.

Urging Republican primary voters to "check the box for another good conservative - Greg Abbott for Governor of Texas," Palin, via Facebook, claimed that "Greg has overcome many personal obstacles and challenges, which have made him a believer in the power of liberty and the need to defend our freedoms from the overreach of an out-of-control federal government. If he is good enough for Ted Nugent, he is good enough for me!" [Bolding ours]

The failed former GOP vice presidential candidate and half-term Alaska governor ignored -- or, rather, likely relished -- the 65-year old rocker and NRA board member's comments last month.

Ted Nugent is just this week getting slammed for his January comments at a Las Vegas gun expo. He called President Barack Obama "a communist-raised, communist-educated, communist-nurtured, subhuman mongrel."

Yesterday, Wolf Blitzer went ballistic over the remarks -- and, more so, over the fact that Abbott is campaigning with Nugent across Texas this week.

Rating Blitzer's response to Nugent's outrageous attack as "True," Politifact yesterday explained and defended the CNN anchor's comments:

"That's what the Nazis called Jews to justify the genocide of the Jewish community," Blitzer said in a Feb. 18, 2014, interview. "They called them untermenschen, subhuman mongrels. If you read some of the literature that the Nazis put out there, there is a long history of that specific phrase he used involving the president of the United States."

Blitzer's interview made waves through the political world, so we wanted to check his assertion about the words "subhuman mongrel."

In his CNN interview, Blitzer cited the work of Nazi party official Julius Streicher. But our research shows Blitzer is correct well beyond an individual Nazi party official. The words subhuman and mongrel were used interchangably but generally had the same derogatory meaning.

David Myers, a historian at the University of California at Los Angeles, said Adolph Hitler used the word "untermensch" or subhuman in his book Mein Kampf in 1925.

"From that point forward, it was part of the Nazi lexicon," Myers said. "That and 'mischling' or mongrel, were intoned with daily regularity by the Nazi propaganda machine."

Of course, were anyone to attack Palin for endorsing Abbott and Nugent, she would scream about her "First Amendment liberties" being infringed, as the former chair of the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, former Mayor of Wasilla, former "Miss Congeniality," former sportscaster, former head of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, former star of "Sarah Palin's Alaska," and former and current Fox News contributor, has done in the past -- wholly misunderstanding the concept.

Perhaps ironically, Palin's chances at the presidency ended forever on January 12, 2011, when she released a tone-deaf video response to the Arizona shooting that left Gabby Giffords critically wounded, six dead -- including a nine-year old girl, three women in their seventies, and a federal judge -- and a dozen others wounded.

In that video, you'll remember, Palin used the anti-Semitic term, "blood libel."

Now, she's using a gun-slinging, homophobic, cowardly pig mass-murderer recently accused of using racist and possibly anti-Semitic comments and a threat of murder against the president of the United States of America, and racially-charged comments against Trayvon Martin, to shore up her own flailing political career.

Apparently, Palin has yet to learn her lesson.

 

Image by Gage Skidmore via Flickr

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